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Final Project: Matt Kleinmann

May 18, 2011

Conceptual Train Diagram

The Crossroads

Choosing a site for the project, it was important to first identify a location that had been previously disturbed. The bluff overlooking the crossroads of Highways 50 and 177 was a former commercial feeding operation (CFO) that has sat abandoned for over thirty years. The project’s goal is to restore the site to prairie grass and to locate a visitor’s center and hotel rooms along the perimeter. With the restored landscape, the foreground grasses create the illusion that, while located in close proximity to a major proposed Amtrak train station, the site is located in the middle of the Flint Hills. By relating to the vernacular practice of an economy of means, the site drop-off and erection, and specific choice of materials, are conceived with a low-budget and tight construction schedule in mind.

Site aerial

Site aerial

The Entrance

The Entrance

Site Plan

Site Plan

Night render

Night render

Floor Plan

Floor Plan

Cliff Cut

Cliff Cut

Room Cut

Room Cut

Spa render

Spa render

Final Project: Jared Marcantoni

May 18, 2011
Plan

Plan

Position on the Prairie

Cuts made in the land draw visitors into the project and beyond, onto paths which extend out onto the landscape. From within the embedded mass of the main building, cuts bring the outside in, as diffuse sky light is reflected off of polished floors. At times, dynamic shadows appear on the floor as the sun shines through the dancing grass above. A screen wall along the southern edge of the lodge filters views, provides shade, and serves as a buffer from the harshest south winds. At each bar of guest rooms, a screen of wood slats partially encloses the corridor, offering only a view of the sky and the sounds of the grass. The most pristine panoramic views are reserved for the guest rooms.

Exhibition Space

Exhibition Space

South façade screen during different times and seasons

South façade screen during different times and seasons

South

South façade screen interior view

Exterior corridor behind guest room bar

Exterior corridor behind guest room bar

Guest room section

Guest room section

Flint Hills Studio Final Review

May 18, 2011
Instructor Wendell Burnette explains the project and site selection to reviewers Heather Woofter (left) and John Grabl

Instructor Wendell Burnette explains the project and site selection to reviewers Heather Woofter (left) and John Grable (photo by Yu-Cheng Hsieh)

Our final review was held in Steinberg Hall at Washington University in St. Louis on Friday, May 6th, 2011. Four students presented during the morning session and nine students presented during the afternoon session.

Morning Session

Students

      Boris Tchatalbachev

 

      James Klauder

 

      Lavender Tessmer

 

    Jing Chen

Reviewers

Instructor:

      Wendell Burnette: Principal,

Wendell Burnette Architects

WashU Faculty:

      Catalina Freixas: Senior Lecturer

 

      Don Koster: Senior Lecturer

 

      Heather Woofter: Associate Professor; Principal,

Axi:Ome

Visitors:

      John Grable: Principal,

John Grable Architects, Inc.

Boris Tchatalbachev (photo by Yu-Cheng Hsieh)

Boris Tchatalbachev (photo by Yu-Cheng Hsieh)

James Klauder (photo by Yu-Cheng Hsieh)

James Klauder (photo by Yu-Cheng Hsieh)

Afternoon Session

Students

      Matthew Kleinmann

 

      Andrew Buck

 

      Yu-Cheng Hsieh

 

      John Wheadon

 

      Kristin Rose

 

      Andrea Fisk

 

      Gabriel Lampe

 

      Max Bemberg

 

    Jared Marcantoni

Reviewers

Instructor

      Wendell Burnette: Principal,

Wendell Burnette Architects

WashU Faculty

      Andrew Cruse: Visiting Assistant Professor

 

      Kathryn Dean: Director of the Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design; Principal,

Dean/Wolf Architects

    Pablo Moyano, Lecturer

Visitors

      Manuel Bailo: Principal,

Add+Arquitectura

      John Grable: Principal,

John Grable Architects, Inc.

      Alfredo Paya: Principal,

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Matthew Kleinmann (photo by Yu-Cheng Hsieh)

Matthew Kleinmann (photo by Yu-Cheng Hsieh)

Andrew Buck (Max Bemberg)

Andrew Buck (photo by Max Bemberg)

Yu-Cheng Hsieh (photo by Max Bemberg)

Yu-Cheng Hsieh (photo by Max Bemberg)

John Wheadon (photo by Max Bemberg)

John Wheadon (photo by Max Bemberg)

Kristin Rose (photo by Max Bemberg)

Kristin Rose (photo by Max Bemberg)

Andrea Fisk and Alfredo Paya (photo by Max Bemberg)

Andrea Fisk and Alfredo Paya (photo by Max Bemberg)

Gabriel Lampe (photo by Max Bemberg)

Gabriel Lampe (photo by Max Bemberg)

Jared Marcantoni (photo by Max Bemberg)

Jared Marcantoni (photo by Max Bemberg)

Our Second Visit to the Flint Hills

April 24, 2011
Bison on the preserve

Bison on the preserve (photo by John Wheadon)

Saturday

After presenting our projects (Part 1 and Part 2) to the public in Cottonwood Falls on Saturday morning, we drove out onto the prairie to see the annual burning of the grasses. Ranchers burn their pastures in late March or early April each year to clear the dead winter grasses. Because the grasses have stored energy in their deep root systems since late summer, the burning provokes rapid spring growth in time for the arrival of yearling cattle from Texas and Mexico. We found our first burnings north of Alma in Wabaunsee County. The hillsides were blackened, revealing the enormous scattering of flint stones that gave the Flint Hills their name and prevented the uplands from being plowed for cultivation.

The freshly burned landscape

The freshly burned landscape (photo by James Klauder)

Wendell meets a ranch worker who's overseeing a burn

Wendell meets a ranch worker who's overseeing a burn (photo by Max Bemberg)

Burning grasses

Burning grasses (photo by Yu-Cheng Hsieh)

In the early evening, we stopped for beer, chips, and salsa at a historic farm being restored by George Terbovich, an interior designer from Kansas City. In addition to his interior design practice, George owns George, a curated antiques store in Kansas City. A lover of the Flint Hills, he is in the process of remodeling historic hotel in Alma with David Dowell of El Dorado Architects.

George Terbovich and David Dowell outside of George's restored historic farmhouse

George Terbovich and David Dowell outside of George's restored historic limestone farmhouse (photo by James Klauder)

As it happened, the pasture behind George's farm was burning that evening

As it happened, the pasture behind George's farm was burning that evening (photo by Max Bemberg))

Wendell observes the burning grasses

Wendell observes the burning grasses (photo by James Klauder)

Getting in it

Getting in it (photo by Yu-Cheng Hsieh)

Sunday

On Sunday we split into groups to visit our various project sites to further documentation. Some of our sites are located near main roads and easy to reach. Others have chosen locations out on the west border of the preserve. Jared Marcantoni had to hike several miles to reach his site near the northwest corner of the preserve.

Gabe Lampe (left) and Andrew Buck crossing Fox Creek near the Spring Hill Ranch

Gabe Lampe (left) and Andrew Buck crossing Fox Creek near the Spring Hill Ranch (photo by James Klauder)

Boris Tchatalbachev's ride parked across from the Spring Hill Ranch

Boris Tchatalbachev's ride parked across from the Spring Hill Ranch (photo by James Klauder)

Jared Marcantoni drains water from his shoe on his way to the northwest corner of the Preserve

Jared Marcantoni drains water from his shoe on his way to the northwest corner of the Preserve (photo by John Wheadon)

Presentation in Cottonwood Falls Part 2

April 22, 2011

Jing Chen

Guest room exterior perspective rendering

Exterior perspective rendering (image by Jing Chen)

During our first trip to the Fling Hills, two things left a strong impression with me. The first was the way the stones hide in the grass. I liked the looming feeling when they were unseen before they appeared. The other thing that impressed me when I was in the prairie is that I was surrounded on every side by the grasses. When you looking at the views, it should be flat like a photo, but a 360 degree view. These are the two main concepts of my design.

Guest room section

Guest room section (drawing by Jing Chen)

Guest room interior perspective rendering

Guest room interior perspective rendering (image by Jing Chen)

Andrea Fisk: “The Sublime Void”

Perspective rendering of the restaurant

Perspective rendering of the restaurant (image by Andrea Fisk)

I began by looking at prairie art and literature to distill what is so compelling about this landscape. Walt Whitman noted that, while this landscape is not as dramatic or picturesque as the landscapes of the West, it is more compelling to be in, to travel through and experience. He called this “the sublime void.” My project seeks to maintain the experience of an empty, boundless landscape by blending it into the ground: a humble building, respecting the naked prairie in which it is located.

Sections

Sections through the public courtyard, above, and the guest rooms and parking, below (drawing by Andrea Fisk)

Exterior perspective, approach to the the guest rooms

Exterior perspective, approach to the guest rooms (image by Andrea Fisk)

Yu-Cheng Hsieh: “Boundless Frontier”

Exterior perspective rendering

Exterior perspective rendering (Image by Yu-Cheng Hsieh)

The Visitor Center, located south of Cottonwood Falls, creates opportunities to expand the Tallgrass National Preserve and consequently bring a greater field of vision of the large-scale prairie. My concept is to lift the landscape and concentrate all functions under the lifted space, creating a continuous view of the landscape. In addition to the view of the sunset of the prairie which is available to every room, visitors in the living rooms can extend their view over the guest rooms’ rooftop and eventually reach the prairie. Moreover, not only is the view is available to the visitors in the guest rooms, a direct touch of the tall grass is also provided.

Landscape concept diagram

Landscape concept diagram (drawing by Yu-Cheng Hsieh)

Guest room interior perspective

Guest room interior perspective (image by Yu-Cheng Hsieh)

Gabe Lampe: “Bridging Barriers”

Guest cabins as viewed from the crossing at Fox Creek

Guest cabins as viewed from the crossing at Fox Creek (image by Gabe Lampe)

My site is situated on the opposite side of the historic Spring Ranch, connecting the more traveled west side of the preserve with the east side. The Visitor Center bridges Fox Creek housing a restaurant, ranger offices, campground amenities, and an art gallery including all associated support services. The most public part of the building, the lobby and restaurant are placed at the end of the building path allowing a procession of experiences that culminates with a view of the hill. Thirty cabins along a fence line stand five feet above ground act as framing device for the landscape and provide a bridge across the fence. Charred-wood siding fireproofs the cabins. The black-boxed cabins floating above the grasses will aid the subtle beauty landscape in juxtaposition to the ever-changing colors of the grasses.

Site selection diagram (collage by Gabe Lampe)

Site selection diagram (collage by Gabe Lampe)

Guest cabin interior perspective rendering

Guest cabin interior perspective rendering (image by Gabe Lampe)

Kristin Rose: “In the Line”

Exterior perpective rendering

Exterior perpective rendering (image by Kristin Rose)

This project runs along the fence line on the Eastern edge of the preserve, creating an inhabited threshold between expansive and close horizon views, privately owned prairie and the preserve. Public spaces open on both sides of the building along extended circulation paths. These paths blur the termini of the building by continuing seamlessly into the prairie itself.

Cross section

Cross section (drawing by Kristin Rose)

Interior perspective rendering

Interior perspective rendering (image by Kristin Rose)

John Wheadon: “Tallgrass Prairie Retreat”

The approach to the public program

The approach to the public program (image by John Wheadon)

In the arrival sequence, the stereotomic architecture appears like the faceless rolling landscape. It is not until the visitor is deep within the draw between the buildings that the entrances become visible. The uphill view entices a visitor forward. Likewise the uphill view draws a visitor out of the public buildings into the landscape. But the quiet serenity of looking out over a vista after a long hike is offered to visitors who stay in the lodging. The design works to mimic the multiplicity of experiences of this landscape and preserve the quality of a remote retreat.

Typical guest room plan

Typical guest room plan (drawing by John Wheadon)

Presentation in Cottonwood Falls Part 1

April 15, 2011

Last weekend we returned to Cottonwood Falls to present our projects to members of the Chase County community. The presentations took place from 9:00 AM till 1:00 PM on Saturday, April 9th in a forum open to the public. On Saturday afternoon we went out on the prairie to see controlled burns of the grasses and on Sunday we split into small groups and visited our various project sites to do additional research and documentation. We now have three weeks remaining to develop our projects before our final review on Friday, May 6th. Here are the first six of twelve projects we presented last weeekend.

Pinning Up

Pinning up our presentation boards in the Haw Building in Cottonwood Falls the night before our presentations (photo by Andrew Buck)

Presentation

Matt Kleinman presents his project on Saturday morning (image by Max Bemberg)

Max Bemberg:

Max Render 1

Exterior perspective rendering (image by Max Bemberg)

In order to reconnect the towns of Strong City and Cottonwood Falls with the Tallgrass National Prairie Preserve, this project for a new visitor’s center and motel is located on the southeastern edge of the Preserve as a filter between the natural and urban. People will be drawn off Route 50, leave their cars on the edge of the preserve, learn about the history and culture of the prairie and wander off to explore the Flint Hills on trails and roads that lead not only out into the preserve but south into Strong City and Cottonwood Falls as well.

Max Diagram

Project concept diagram (drawing by Max Bemberg)

Max Render2

Night perspective rendering (image by Max Bemberg)

Andrew Buck:

Collage

The Tallgrass Prairie is a landscape of transitions and thresholds, no more apparent than at the Fox Creek Lowland, in this area all of the phases of the prairie are experienced: The Spring Hill Mansion, the Scenic By-way, the farmland, the creek, the great grassy plateau, and the endless sky. The architecture of this place must seek to accent and develop these thresholds. There is no greater thrill on the prairie then the feeling of slipping through another’s land, another hill, another valley into a different world.

Campfire Units

Campfire units exterior perspective (image by Andrew Buck)

James Klauder: “Threading the Edge”

Distant Elevation

View of the guest room bar as seen in the Fox Creek gallery forest from Kansas Route 177 (image by James Klauder)

The bar containing the guest rooms is threaded along the edge condition of Fox Creek. Vertical hardwood battens dematerialize the prospect of the building from afar. Perched along the creek, the guest rooms look out from the shelter of the trees into the tall dense grasses of a restored bottomland prairie to the west and onto the rocky prairie uplands to the east.

Area Plan

Area plan showing the Spring Hill Ranch in the upper left corner, the proposed visitors center due east, and the guest rooms threaded along Fox Creek to the south (drawing by James Klauder)

Guest Room

View from a guest room onto a controlled burn in the upland prairie across the creek to the east (image by James Klauder)

Matt Kleinman:

Exterior perspective rendering

Exterior perspective rendering (image by Matt Kleinman)

Night perspective rendering

Night perspective rendering (image by Matt Kleinman)

Guest room perspective rendering

Guest room perspective rendering (image by Matt Kleinman)

Jared Marcantoni: “Position on the Prairie”

Walkway

Walkway through the grasses (image by Jared Marcantoni)

Height of the grasses

Height of the grasses (drawing by Jared Marcantoni)

Cuts made in the land draw visitors into the project and beyond onto paths which extend out onto the landscape. Outside the buildings, the paths enable the continuation of interior spaces out onto the landscape. Views below and through the grass are orchestrated by controlling the rate of descent down the slope. From within the embedded exhibit space, cuts bring the outside in, as diffuse sky light is reflected off of polished floors. At times, dynamic shadows appear on the floor as the sun shines through the dancing grass above.

Exhibit Space

Exhibit space interior rendering (image by Jared Marcantoni)

2011 Flint Hills Studio: Return to the Flint Hills

April 1, 2011

Flint Hills Poster

(poster by Andrea Fisk and Lavender Tessmer)



Student project presentations will be open to the public the morning of Saturday April 9th at the Haw Building in Cottonwood Falls, Kansas.